How to watch NASA’s highly-anticipated Lucy mission to the Trojan asteroids

The Lucy spacecraft will journey to Jupiter’s “Trojan” asteroids to gain insight into the formation of our solar system. Here’s how to watch the mission.

NASA is set to launch its Lucy Spacecraft on an unprecedented mission to Jupiter’s so-called “Trojans.” These Trojans are ancient asteroids around Jupiter’s orbit that will hopefully give researchers an unprecedented view into the early days of our solar system. Lucy’s mission is a long one, and will actually reach the first of the asteroids in 2025! Along the way, Lucy will perform multiple orbital assists to reach the Trojans, and by the end of its mission, Lucy will have reached the most objects with independent orbits of any spacecraft yet.

How to watch Lucy launch

Lucy is scheduled to launch on October 16 at 5:34 a.m. ET (2:34 a.m. PT). Launching on ULA’s Atlas V rocket, the mission will lift off from Launch Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral. NASA will begin coverage of Lucy’s flight roughly 30 minutes before launch at 5 a.m. EDT (2 a.m. PST). You can find the livestream on the NASA TV website, and on YouTube. Additionally, Space Explored will be covering the launch live.

Viewing in person

If you’re interested in watching Lucy lift-off in person, there are a few ways to do so. Unfortunately, the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex is closed for viewing at the time of launch with some exceptions. NASA is encourage people to participate virtually. Since the mission is launching from Cape Canaveral, you will be able to watch the launch from some easter parts of Florida. Those in the Titusville and Cocoa Beach area will have no problem seeing (and hearing) this liftoff, while places as far west as Orlando may have a chance to see the flame of this night launch.

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