ESA introduces new class of Astronaut candidates

2022 ESA Astronaut Candidates

For the first time in 13 years, the European Space Agency has chosen a new class of astronauts. This group of 17 was chosen from a group of over 22,500 candidates and brings in five new career astronauts, 11 members of the astronaut reserve, and one astronaut with a disability as a member of the Parastronaut Feasibility Study.

Continue Reading

Display your message on the iPad flying around the Moon

That’s right! While Artemis 1 is an important mission for the return of humanity to the Moon, everyone back here on Earth has the opportunity to participate by sending messages to an iPad that resides within the Orion spacecraft. A camera will capture the message on the iPad within the capsule and share the recording, so while sending your message beyond the Moon you can spread it to other people here on Earth. And sending your message is really simple. Here’s how.

Continue Reading

See the damage SLS caused to NASA’s Mobile Launcher

NASA’s SLS rocket is the most powerful rocket the agency has every built. It should be no surprise that the two five-segment SRBs and four RS-25 engines left behind a bit of damage at the pad. Yesterday, NASA shared some of the first photos showing the Mobile Launcher, and the damage it sustained, up close.

Continue Reading

Watch NASA’s historic Artemis 1 launch in slow motion

While plenty of people on the space coast and around the world stayed up to watch the SLS rocket take flight for the very first time on the historic Artemis 1 launch, that 1:47 a.m. ET liftoff wasn’t ideal for those who wanted to catch some sleep. But we captured the launch of Artemis 1 in slow motion from the press site, so whether you missed liftoff when it happened or just want to relive the moment, you can do so.

Artemis 1 (and Snoopy) pass by the Moon

After launching last Wednesday, the Orion spacecraft has reached the Moon, with Snoopy as its zero-G indicator on board. This test flight around the Moon and back will prove the systems of the Orion spacecraft and the SLS rocket, allowing humans to step aboard the rocket the next time it launches ahead of our return to the Moon.

Continue Reading

Track Artemis 1 on its journey to the Moon and back

NASA’s Space Launch System rocket may have taken flight early Wednesday morning, but as with most missions, the rocket launch is only the start of it! The Orion spacecraft is on a journey to the Moon and back, proving all the systems ahead of humans stepping aboard the spacecraft on Artemis II. Here’s how you can follow with this historic mission and track Orion on its journey.

Continue Reading

NASA’s historic flight of Artemis 1 in photos

Artemis 1 is a historic mission, the first flight of the SLS rocket that will return humans to the Moon. For now, the SLS rocket and Orion spacecraft are uncrewed, as this test mission will fly around the Moon and prove the systems that will carry humans in a few years time.

Continue Reading

Space Explored 55: Interview with NASA’s Tom Engler, Shotwell leads Starship, more

This week we bring an interview out of the archives with NASA’s Tom Engler on how Kennedy Space Center has changed from the Shuttle program to now. Jared and Seth also discuss the week’s top headlines and correctly predicted Artemis 1’s fate.

Subscribe

https://spaceexplored.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/10/2022/11/SE_Pod_11-15-22.mp3

James Webb reveals protostar cocooned within dark hourglass-shaped clouds

NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope has released a spectacular new image of a newly forming star about 460 light-years from Earth. The news came just hours after NASA’s successful SLS launch from Cape Canaveral.

Continue Reading

Artemis 1 has left the pad, this time under its own power

After years of delays and several frustrating launch attempts, Artemis 1 has launched and is on its way to the Moon. Finally, the planets aligned for NASA and the SLS rocket to take flight and wow onlookers who have waited for this moment for a very long time.

Continue Reading

Quick Thoughts: ESA astronaut Luca Parmitano on the launch of Artemis 1

Before settling down in NASA’s press center at Kennedy Space Center for tonight’s launch, I was able to speak with ESA astronaut Luca Parmitano on the role Europe plays in this launch. “NASA will always be the agency that put a man on the moon 50 years ago,” Luca said, “But nowadays, we as a European space agency are trying to catch up, and we want to be part of this incredible endeavor.”

I asked Luca if he believed tonight is the night Artemis 1 will finally launch. He thinks we are 50/50 but still very excited to see this candle light.

https://spaceexplored.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/10/2022/11/ESALucaParmitano_Artemis1_01.mp3

Space Force’s top secret spaceplane returns from orbit after a 908-day mission

It seems to be a news story that takes place every couple of years, but early Saturday morning, sonic booms were heard across Florida Space Coast. Those rather iconic booms could only mean one thing, the arrival of NASA’s Space Shuttle or the Space Force’s classified X37-B spaceplane. Since all of NASA’s shuttles have been collecting dust in museums for the past decade, it must be that pesky X37-B.

Continue Reading

SpaceX President and COO Gwynne Shotwell is now in charge of Starship’s development

It sounds like SpaceX’s Starship program is getting another leadership change, and this time it’s a big one. SpaceX employee number 11, Gwynne Shotwell, the President and COO of the company, will now lead its development.

Continue Reading

List of all active robots on and around Mars

Humanity has populated Mars with a variety of robots over the years. From rovers to landers to orbiting spacecraft, there’s been a lot – and it can be overwhelming. Read on to see all the missions still active on and around Mars today.

Continue Reading

Government agencies are finally taking UFOs seriously

UFOs, which are more commonly referred to as UAPs these days, have been in the media quite a bit since 2017. This is due to a piece written by the New York Times, which was credited with starting up the UFO curiosity machine for the first time in decades. Since then, the stigma that has notoriously surrounded the topic has finally begun to wane, and various governments have become publically interested in the subject.

Continue Reading

ULA and NASA test inflatable heat shield on Atlas launch from California

Early November 10, ULA launched an Atlas V from Space Launch Complex 3 at Vandenberg Space Force Station. The mission carried JPSS-2 and an inflatable decelerator to prove the systems to and gather data on this unique type of heat shield.

Continue Reading

Northrop Grumman Cygnus spacecraft arrives at the space station – despite a failed solar panel

Early this morning, Northrop Grumman’s SS Sally Ride Cygnus spacecraft arrived at the International Space Station carrying 8,200 pounds of supplies for the seven crewmembers. However, the Cygnus is missing one of its now iconic circular solar panels due to an unknown failure.

Continue Reading

Astronomers locate new closest black hole to Earth

Black holes are arguably the most fascinating yet violent objects in the known universe, and a Harvard astrophysicist just discovered the closest one to Earth yet. But no need to panic, as even this black hole is still 1,600 light-years away and dormant, at least for now.

Continue Reading

Space Explored Podcast 54: Falcon Heavy launch, Amazon looks at SpaceX, more

This week (on the late episode of the podcast), Seth and Jared talk about their very different Falcon Heavy launch experiences, less than 13 miles apart. They also recap the headlines from the past week, including Amazon’s thoughts on the launch of Kuiper with SpaceX, Elon and Twitter, and even some Artemis news.

Subscribe

https://spaceexplored.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/10/2022/11/SEPod_11-03-22.mp3

Quick Thoughts: A bad case of the space Mondays

Have you ever woken up on a Monday morning and thought to yourself, “yeah, no, I don’t want to do anything,” and then you attempt to get up, and the day doesn’t stop punching? That was today for the space industry. We work up to a new report of Subtropical Storm Nicole making landfall on Florida’s Space Coast (just in time for Artemis 1 to be rolled out to the pad), Northrop Grumman’s Cygnus spacecraft only having one solar panel deployed, and an absolutely terrible weather forecast for SpaceX’s next Falcon 9 launch.

I guess here’s the deal, Mondays suck not just for the average person but even for the most talented and intelligent people we know. I just got back from SpaceX’s Falcon Heavy launch on Saturday, and I hopefully plan to drive back down from Wisconsin for Artemis 1 and an airshow this Thursday, both of which could be canceled, so I guess the joke is on me?

Will Elon Musk’s purchase of Twitter affect SpaceX? Probably not

Two weeks ago, SpaceX founder and CEO Elon Musk officially took control of Twitter, an app you probably used to get to this article. We’ve seen Musk start new companies since creating SpaceX, but this is the first significant company he has taken control of since Tesla in 2004. So what does this new addition to the Elon portfolio mean for SpaceX?

Continue Reading

Artemis 1’s third launch attempt is in a week–unless the weather says otherwise

Currently, we’re at L-6 days to the next launch attempt of NASA’s maiden flight of the Space Launch System (SLS) with the Orion spacecraft on the Artemis 1 mission. A critical test flight for the launch systems, however, Florida is yet again under threat from another tropical storm.

Continue Reading

Everything you need to know about tomorrow’s total lunar eclipse

Early tomorrow morning, people around the globe will have the opportunity to view one of the most spectacular events in the sky, a total lunar eclipse. Here’s a rundown of how to watch this event and why total lunar eclipses are often referred to as “blood moons.”

Continue Reading

Starlink drops speed, introduces data cap with reduced speed, 1Mbps speeds for business after limit

SpaceX’s high-speed satellite internet service, Starlink, has changed a great deal from when it first came out. Starlink has seen reduced real-world speeds for a while as a result of the large number of customers, but now Starlink has changed its expected download speeds to much lower targets. Additionally, the company has introduced soft data-caps and the ability to pay for more priority access.

Continue Reading

SpaceX subsidiary Swarm joins Starlink website offering IOT connectivity

Things have pretty quiet since SpaceX acquired the IOT company Swarm last year. SpaceX’s exact plans for the company weren’t clear and the company continued operating (now with basically free launch cost), but the company’s low-speed IOT focused satellite network seemed like a good companion to Starlink. Now, the Starlink website has added a new IOT link to the Swarm website, where customers can buy an evaluation kit, modem, or asset tracker.

Continue Reading

YouTuber tests rocket propulsion, airbags & drones to ‘prevent’ impact damage on dropped phones

YouTuber William Osman has created all sorts of wacky inventions – from building his own X-Ray machine to “almost ruining” Mr. Beast’s popular Squid Game video with indicators for when a player is knocked out. This time around, he followed a number of viewer suggestions to test various ways to prevent cracked screens on dropped cellphones. These ranged from the more tame drone motors, springs, and parachutes to (the totally inadvisable – don’t try this at home) airbags and rocket motors.

Continue Reading

Falcon Heavy flies again; Dual-booster landing from USSF-44 sends sonic booms across the space coast

Three years after its last flight, SpaceX’s Falcon Heavy has returned to flight on this cloudy Florida morning. The primary payload of this launch is the classified USSF-44 satellite, with two other satellites co-manifested. The launch occurred on November 1 at 9:41 a.m. Eastern Time, successfully delivering the satellites to their targeted geosynchronous orbit.

Continue Reading

When is the next SpaceX Falcon Heavy Launch?

What do you get when you take three Falcon 9 boosters and strap them together? Well, a Falcon Heavy of course. Right now, the most powerful rocket (we won’t be able to say that for much longer), SpaceX doesn’t get to launch it often, but when they do, everyone wants to see The next Falcon Heavy launch scheduled for November 1 at 9:41 a.m. EDT from LC-39A at Kennedy Space Center.

Continue Reading

NASA discovers largest fresh meteoroid impact on Mars in 16 years

Last year, on December 24, NASA’s InSight lander detected a magnitude 4 marsquake, which initially didn’t appear to be anything out of the ordinary. Only later did NASA learn that this particular marsquake was quite remarkable, caused by one of the largest meteoroid strikes that NASA has ever seen on Mars.

Continue Reading

SpaceX reportedly dodged Starship accident during full stack test, Starlink chief now leading project

According to a report from The Information, SpaceX could be pushing its Starship production too fast, with safety concerns reported by employees during a recent full stack test. All this under the eyes of Starlink’s chief, now unofficially running the program.

Continue Reading

Amazon open to launching Project Kuiper satellites with SpaceX Falcon Heavy and Starship

Sometimes it’s good to be a competitor, and sometimes it’s nice to be a launch provider. SpaceX gets to be both and profit off its competitors. Amazon Senior Vice President Dave Limp said the company is also open to SpaceX’s capabilities to launch its Project Kuiper satellites.

Continue Reading

Vulcan inflatable heat shield test launching on Atlas V in early November

When spacecraft reenter, they need a heat shield to protect them from the immense friction and heat of speeding through the atmosphere. Usually, these are rigid structures, but ULA plans to use an inflatable heat shield to protect the engines of their Vulcan rocket and recover them for reuse. They’ll be testing out that type of heat shield next month.

Continue Reading

Voyager’s first Project Scientist retires after 50 years on the job

Talk about dedication to your job! While the average employee only stays at their company for four years, Edward Stone stuck around for 50. On Tuesday, he finally retired from JPL, where he served as Voyager’s Project Scientist.

Continue Reading

Elon Musk brings whole new meaning to ‘high speed’ satellite internet with vehicle-optimized Starlink terminal

One of the options Starlink customers have been waiting on, for quite a while, is the ability to use Starlink terminals while in motion. With Starlink Maritime the company released the ability to use the high-speed internet while in motion out at sea, but at last, there is an official option for customers who want to mount a Starlink terminal on top of their RV or other vehicles for in-motion use.

Continue Reading

Space Explored Podcast 53: What Polaris Dawn will do in space, lots of SpaceX in the news, more

This week Seth and Jared dive into the science that Polaris Dawn will complete while in space. There are also plenty of SpaceX headlines to talk about as we near the fourth Falcon Heavy launch.

Subscribe

https://spaceexplored.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/10/2022/10/SEPod_10-24-22-1.mp3

OneWeb returns with first launch from India; mega-constellation over 70% complete

It’s not often that we discuss the launch of a mega constellation other than Starlink, but over the weekend, OneWeb became the first commercial launch on India’s largest rocket. This was also the company’s return to launching since it broke ties with Russia over the country’s invasion of Ukraine.

Continue Reading

James Webb telescope teams up with Chandra X-Ray Observatory for astronautical collab

If the James Webb Space Telescope had a resume, the very first quality of it would read “Works well with others.” Webb already stunned the world when its first pictures were released earlier in 2022. Then the world’s minds were blown again when images from Webb were combined with images from the Hubble Space Telescope. Now, JWST has made another friend: the Chandra X-Ray Observatory.

Continue Reading

OSHA case still open after SpaceX employee severely injured testing Raptor V2 last January

On February 23, 2022, an OSHA Inspection was opened after a SpaceX employee was injured during a test of the Raptor V2 engine. The incident left the employee in a coma for months. Though the incident resulted in a rather disastrous outcome, these hazards are not unknown or unusual for spaceflight testing.

Continue Reading

Space Explored Podcast 52: Elon, Starlink, and Ukraine, more

Seth and Jared discuss what is going on in Ukraine with Elon Musk and Starlink. They also catch you up on the top headlines in space from this past week.

Subscribe

https://spaceexplored.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/10/2022/10/SEPod_10-17-22.mp3

Crew-4 splashes down off the coast of Florida

After roughly six months aboard the International Space Station, the Crew-4 astronauts have returned to Earth, splashing down off the coast of Jacksonville, Florida on Friday, October 14.

Continue Reading

Astra gets delisting warning from NASDAQ after poor stock performance

It’s already been about a month since Astra’s closing price on NASDAQ went below the $1 limit, which triggers some issues with the powers that be in New York. Since then, the stock price has continued to decrease in value as failed launches have led the company to shift to a new rocket design.

Continue Reading

SpaceX shares stellar video of Jellyfish effect from droneship

During select rocket launches, when the sun has just set below the horizon or has yet to rise, a unique phenomenon can occur – known by space fans as a jellyfish. This occurs when the exhaust in the high atmosphere is illuminated by the sun, but viewed from darkness.

SpaceX announces crew members for second Starship flight around the Moon

SpaceX is still a long way away from putting crew on their Starship rocket and launching it into space, but the company just announced the first two people who will be joining the company’s second spaceflight around the Moon.

Continue Reading

Ariane 6 second stage comes to life in first hot fire test

Arianespace is making great strides in the push to launch the Ariane 6. In a recent blog post, they shared a video of a test firing of the second stage.

Continue Reading

Space Explored 51: Astra delisting notice, Elon Musk with Ukraine, more

This week Seth and Jared dive into Astra Space receiving a delisting warning from the NASDAQ and what that means if you own shares of the company. Also, they catch you up on all the rockets that launched last (eight in seven days!!!), Elon Musk’s peace idea for Ukraine and Taiwan, oh and what’s the deal with that Crew-5 Meatball?

Subscribe

https://spaceexplored.com/wp-content/uploads/sites/10/2022/10/SEPod_10-10-22.mp3

That time when NASA became experts in *checks notes* Maritime Salvage Law

“‘Twas a dark and very stormy night, November 14-15, 1994…” is how the legal brief begins its description of events that led to the largest maritime salvage operation at the time. Space shuttle external tank 70 (ET-70) was aboard the barge Poseidon when Tropical Storm Gordon decided to make this trip from New Orleans to Cape Canaveral anything but ordinary.

Continue Reading

Rocket Lab continues its steady launch pace with “It Argos Up From Here”

Rocket Lab just completed its 8th successful launch of the year. “It Argos Up From Here” saw their Electron rocket put ARGOS-4 into orbit for the NOAA.

Continue Reading

Watch NASA and SpaceX’s Crew 5 launch in slow motion [Video]

On Wednesday October 5, SpaceX and NASA launched another operational Crew mission to the International Space Station. This mission was particularly notable for being SpaceX’s first Crew Dragon mission to carry a Russian Cosmonaut.