NASA Announces Virtual Webb STEAM Day Event for Students, Educators

NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope is getting ready to launch to space from French Guiana in early December. NASA announced a STEAM Day for students and educators to get ready for the big day ahead of the launch.

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Space Station Crew to Relocate Soyuz, Make Room for New Crewmates

Roscosmos is preparing to relocate the MS-18 Soyuz spacecraft next Tuesday to make room for the crew of MS-19 arriving next month.

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[Scoop] Artemis 1 CubeSats get second chance at integration thanks to SLS testing delays

SLS is undergoing testing ahead of Orion integration and rollout for the Wet Dress Rehearsal for the Artemis 1 mission. But it’s not only Orion going to the Moon. 13 CubeSats are tagging along, at least now it’s 13…

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[Updated: NASA Statement] Kennedy Space Center now ‘all clear’ following emergency lockdown

NASA’s Kennedy Space Center was under an emergency lockdown earlier today.

Rocket Lab announces contract to launch entire constellation for Kinéis

The California-based smallsat launcher, Rocket Lab, announced Wednesday that they will be launching 5 missions for Internet-of-Things (IoT) connectivity provider Kinéis. This will make Rocket Lab the exclusive launcher of Kinéis’

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NBC News to host joint interview with Elon Musk and Jared Isaacman tonight

Tonight on NBC Nightly News, Tom Costello will be sitting down for a joint interview with SpaceX founder Elon Musk and billionaire Jared Isaacman. During the interview, Costello will also be given an exclusive tour of SpaceX’s headquarters in Hawthorne, California.

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SLS: NASA to proceed with second Green Run test in late February

Late last week, NASA announced that it would perform a second hotfire test of the Space Launch System (SLS) core stage. While the decision will likely cause SLS to miss its launch date later this year, it will allow NASA and Boeing the opportunity to collect necessary data.

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This Day In Space (February 1, 2003): The Space Shuttle Columbia disaster

On January 16, 2003, the Space Shuttle Columbia set off on its 28th mission from Kennedy Space Center in Florida. During the launch, a one-pound piece of foam broke off and impacted the thermal protection system on the edge of the shuttle’s left wing. NASA’s ignorance of the damage caused by this would ultimately spell doom for the crew of seven onboard.

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This Day In Space (January 28, 1986): The Space Shuttle Challenger disaster

On the morning of January 28, 1986, the world watched as the Space Shuttle Challenger launched from Cape Canaveral with a crew of seven onboard. Little did anyone know that the mission would end with a catastrophic failure that would claim the lives of seven and change NASA forever.

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This Day In Space (January 27, 1967): The Apollo 1 tragedy

Apollo 1 was set to be the first crewed mission of the United States Apollo program, designed to put humans on the surface of the Moon. Sadly, the mission never flew due to a tragic accident that NASA deems one of the worst incidents in spaceflight history.

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Three Air Force Global Strike Command bombers to perform flyover during Super Bowl 55

Super Bowl 55 is just around the corner, set to take place on February 7 at Raymond James Stadium in Tampa, Florida. But this year, the Super Bowl will be a bit special with a first-of-its-kind Air Force Global Strike flyover.

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Biden has a moon rock sitting on a bookshelf in the Oval Office

Yes, you read that title correctly; Biden does indeed have a moon rock in the Oval Office. As pointed out by The Washington Post, the moon rock is sitting on a bookshelf and is “intended to remind Americans of the ambition and accompaniments of earlier generations.”

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NASA and the CSA are launching a challenge seeking new food system technologies

Consuming food aboard the International Space Station (ISS) can be a rather tricky task, but luckily, NASA can regularly send more food up. However, when future missions begin calling for astronauts to travel farther out into space, that won’t be an option. Enter the “Deep Space Food Challenge.”

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The Air Force successfully used an AI co-pilot during a Lockheed U-2 flight

On December 15, the US Air Force used artificial intelligence (AI) to control a Lockheed U-2 spy plane’s radar and sensor systems. This marked the first time that AI was given control of any US military system.

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Starlink public beta now available in the UK and Canada

Since October, SpaceX has been slowly rolling out public beta access to its Starlink internet service, and the latest countries to get access are the UK and Canada. People who live in those countries can now sign up for the public beta and have a Starlink user terminal shipped to them.

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Vespara smart telescope wins a CES 2021 innovation award

Vaonis is a French company that just unveiled its latest astrophotography tool, a smart telescope called Vespera. An improvement over the company’s previous smart telescope, Stellina, Vespara just won the CES 2021 Best of Innovation Award for digital imaging and photography.

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Boeing’s Starliner flight software has received a formal requalification

In December 2019, Boeing’s Starliner crew ship failed to reach the International Space Station (ISS) during its Orbital Flight Test mission. Later it was discovered that multiple errors in Starliner’s software caused the failure. Because of this, if Boeing wanted to test Starliner again, its software would need to achieve a formal requalification.

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According to NASA, 2020 tied for the warmest year on record

NASA released a new analysis today that concludes that 2020 tied for the warmest year on record with 2016, continuing our planet’s trend of slowly but surely getting warmer over the past seven years.

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OneWeb drastically reduces expected satellite constellation size

OneWeb put out a press release on Wednesday detailing plans to reduce the size of its proposed satellite constellation substantially. Initially planned to include nearly 48,000 satellites, the updated plan now calls for only about 6,400 in an attempt to reduce the overall cost of the project.

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Senior NASA scientist faces six months in prison after lying about China ties

Meyya Meyyappan, a 66-year-old senior NASA scientist in California, has just pleaded guilty before a US District Judge in Manhattan. The charges brought forth include making false statements to the FBI, NASA, and the USAO about his involvement in China’s Thousand Talents Program.

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Which rover has spent the most time on Mars?

Today officially marks the 3,000th day since the Mars rover Curiosity first arrived at the Martian planet. While this may be a long time by any measure, it got us wondering, what’s the longest period that any rover has spent on Mars?

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‘The Black Vault’ has made all CIA UFO documents available for download

The Black Vault is a website that contains many of the US government’s declassified documents. The site was recently updated to include an archive of PDFs containing all of the CIA’s declassified UFO documents going back to the 1980s. And the best part is that anybody with an internet connection can download all of these files safely and easily now.

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Humanity’s important firsts in space

Space has been called the final frontier by many influential figures throughout the years, and for good reasons. The dark, cold vacuum of space is dangerously unforgiving and reminds us that humans aren’t meant to go there. But as usual, curiosity has prevailed, and humans have made their mark in space, and we continue to do so today. 

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Four concepts chosen for NASA’s Pioneers program

NASA has selected four astrophysics mission concepts that will be in the running to join its Pioneers program. These concepts will undergo a full concept study by NASA, and if everything checks out, they will formally become part of the program.

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Looking back on the failed ‘Mars One’ project

Back in 2011, a company called Mars One was founded by a small private Dutch organization with a single bold claim — to land the first humans on Mars. Not only would it be landing humans on Mars, but it would have them “live, explore, and create a second home for humanity” there.

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With Arecibo’s collapse, some scientists want to build its replacement on the Moon

2020 ended on a low note for the scientific community as the Arecibo Observatory collapsed in early December. However, this event has reinvigorated the discussion around NASA’s proposed Lunar Crater Radio Telescope (LCRT). Some scientists have even suggested that an LCRT on the Moon’s far side could act as a better replacement for Arecibo.

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NASA developing lunar navigation architecture for its upcoming Artemis missions

Preparations for NASA’s Artemis program are in full swing as the first mission, Artemis I, is set to launch later this year. However, one crucial part of the program that still requires a solution is navigation architecture. With extended stays on the moon, humans and autonomous robots alike would benefit greatly from having a system similar to GPS available.

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New image of Mars’ Valles Marineris reveals its enormous scale

Valles Marineris, also known as Mariner Valley, is a vast, expansive canyon covering a quarter of Mars’ equator. The 2,500-mile-long canyon is so large that it has been deemed the largest canyon in our entire solar system.

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A spectrometer has successfully been installed on NASA’s Lucy spacecraft

NASA’s Lucy mission is primed to be the first space mission to study the Trojan asteroids around Jupiter. Today the mission moved one step closer to its launch following the successful integration of the L’TES instrument into the spacecraft.

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A look at NASA’s new xEMU spacesuits

Good spacesuits are arguably the most crucial aspect of any mission to space that involves humans. Even an uncomfortable spacesuit could impose substantial issues or limitations that you wouldn’t expect. That’s why engineers and designers at NASA have been hard at work designing a next-generation spacesuit called xEMU.

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SLS: NASA targeting core stage hot fire test for ‘as early as January 17’

A couple of weeks ago, on December 20, NASA completed the wet dress rehearsal test for the Space Launch System (SLS) core stage. And then today, the agency finally announced that it would be moving forward with the green run hot fire test, targeting a date “as early as January 17.”

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NASA’s new SPHEREx space telescope has officially entered into its final design stage

SPHEREx, or Spectro-Photometer for the History of the Universe, Epoch of Reionization and Ices Explorer, is NASA’s newest space telescope, and today, NASA announced that the project has entered into “Phase C.” This is essentially a final design phase, meaning that a final design can now be accomplished as well as building out hardware and software for the project.

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NASA satellite imagery shows the recent devastation of climate change

We can likely all agree that 2020 will go down as one of the worst years in history for many reasons. Among those was the devastating effects that climate change had on the Earth, including enormous fires, prolonged droughts, etc. And for better or worse, it was all captured in a series of powerful images by NASA.

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SpaceX Starlink beta invites have been rolling out in the UK

SpaceX has been adding new locations to its Starlink beta program at a rapid pace. A few weeks ago, the UK became the latest country to begin receiving beta invites for the satellite broadband service, with some users already receiving the necessary hardware.

Determining if the BLC-1 signal originated from extraterrestrials

A couple of weeks ago, we reported on a mysterious radio signal (BLC-1) that had been detected by researchers at Breakthrough Listen. Originating from Proxima Centauri, the signal was quickly classified as a possible “alien transmission.” Now astronomers are figuring out how they could verify or disprove that possibility.

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SpaceX chief operating officer discusses her job and the future of Starship in new interview

SpaceX was in the news a lot this year as it achieved many of its extraordinary goals, including 26 launches and becoming the single largest satellite operator in the world. Gwynne Shotwell, chief operating officer at SpaceX, spoke on some of these successes in a new interview with Ars Technica today.

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Axiom Space is creating the first commercial space station

Axiom Space is currently working on plans to develop what will be the world’s first commercial space station. The company has stated that it plans on setting up its headquarters in Houston, where it will later begin production of the bold project.

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The story behind the ‘flying saucer’ that crash-landed in the Utah desert

On November 4, 2018, NASA’s Astronomy Picture of the Day was titled “Flying Saucer Crash Lands in Utah Desert” and was accompanied by a fitting image. Unfortunately, the image showing a mangled disk in the middle of the desert had nothing to do with extraterrestrials, but it did have quite a fantastic story behind it.

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New algorithm could help minimize damage caused by solar storms

Magnetic storms have the potential to wreak havoc on power grids and communications satellites alike, posing a real danger to civilization. Because of the potential severity of this problem, the Department of Energy (DOE) is rapidly working toward a fix via a new algorithm.

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Harvard science professor believes interstellar object Oumuamua was alien tech, not rogue comet

Our solar system was visited by its first known interstellar object called Oumuamua in 2017. Astronomers observed and collected data on the strange object for 11 days, but the scientific community can’t seem to agree on what the object was even now.

For the extraterrestrial minded, Harvard University Professor of Science Abraham “Avi” Loeb has presented his belief of what Oumuamua actually was…

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An up-close look at the world’s largest radio telescope located in China

CBS News recently had the lucky opportunity to send one of their reporters to China’s Five-hundred-meter Aperture Spherical radio Telescope (FAST). The reporter got an up-close and personal look at the inner workings of the enormous, awe-inspiring telescope.

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NASA testing new ‘super resolution’ flash lidar landing technology

Researchers at NASA’s Langley Research Center are working with Blue Origin in testing a new, more accurate version of flash lidar. The testing is part of NASA’s suite of lunar lander technologies that will be used as part of the Artemis program.

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Puerto Rico’s governor approves $8 million to rebuild Arecibo Observatory

Earlier this month, the Arecibo Observatory in Puerto Rico met its sad demise as the aging facility collapsed overnight. The facility’s destruction was a terrible day for the astronomy community, and rebuilding it felt entirely out of reach. However, Governor Wanda Vázquez Garced just gave those hoping to rebuild Arecibo an unexpected glimmer of hope.

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NASA’s Plum Brook Station renamed to Neil A. Armstrong Test Facility

Plum Brook Station is a remote test facility for NASA’s Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio. It is home to four cutting-edge test facilities used for ground tests for the international space community. Today, a name change for the facility was signed into law.

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A look at NASA’s Technology Transfer Program

NASA’s Technology Transfer Program is rarely talked about but has contributed to many of the technologies that we take for granted in our daily lives. In this article, we will be discussing a few of the essential technologies that have benefited from the program over the years.

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Many in Thailand angered over minister’s decision to send a spacecraft to the Moon

A new report has come out stating that Anek Laothamatas, Thailand’s Minister of Higher Education, Science, Research, and Innovation, wants to build a spacecraft capable of orbiting the moon. The news has sparked some controversy among Thailand residents as they see more pressing issues that could be addressed with the money. 

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First scientist selected to visit space aboard SpaceShipTwo discusses why he’s going

On October 14, NASA announced that it had selected an experiment by the Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) to participate in its Flight Opportunities program. However, what’s unique about this experiment is that the payload will include a human named Alan Stern.

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2021 Intelligence Authorization Act calls for report on Unidentified Aerial Phenomenon

The 2021 Intelligence Authorization Act includes a rather interesting section involving Unidentified Aerial Phenomenon (UAP). The particular section of the act calls upon the UAP Task Force at the Office of Naval Intelligence to submit a report to Congress within 180 days of the act’s enactment date.

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